Friday, April 4, 2014

I dare you to call me a vegan or why I eat meat and feel compelled to bitch slap people who think otherwise

For some reason it is socially acceptable to make healthy eating decisions if you are a vegan but  if you're not then it's just weird. For whatever reason every time I refuse to drink a beer or even have a piece of junk food people first think to ask me if I am vegan.

My answer is usually as follows, "god no!" I personally hate the concept of veganism and think that it is just another way people are contributing to the de-evolution of the human race. It's probably because I'm thin, fit looking, and wear tight bike pants to show off my junk. Joking aside but the simple fact that people associate those who don't eat crap as vegans is a joke.


Like veganism is the only healthy way to eat. In fact despite my complete distaste for the concept I probably eat as much or more vegetables then most veggie loving hipsters. I eat a crap ton of produce but I also eat meat.

There is a great article on Gnolls about how human beings digestive tracts are more evolved to eat meat then say plants. Seeing how we are not ruminants and do not have four stomachs I tend to agree with this concept.

Ruminants, including cattle, bison, deer, antelope, goats, and other red meat, have a special “extra stomach” called the rumen. They chew and swallow grass and leaves into the rumen, ferment it some, barf it back up again, chew it some more (called “chewing the cud”), and swallow it again, where it is digested a second time. Hindgut fermenters, like horses, have an extra-long gut. And rabbits run their food through twice: they eat their own poop in order to get more food value out of the plant matter they eat.
So no I will not be throwing up my food or doing any other such crazy and disgusting practice to eat my food. Like I said though I eat plants and I think it is a good idea for most people to do so as well.

But I also eat meat and of the belief that meat is more nutritionally dense then most plant foods. Not to mention that the consumption of meat and fats contributed to the evolution of human beings by increasing their brain size.

From Chris Kresser
every nutrient in red meat except for vitamin C surpasses those in apples and carrots, and every nutrient—including vitamin C—in beef liver occurs in exceedingly higher levels in beef liver compared to apple and carrots. In general, organ meats are between 10 and 100 times higher in nutrients than corresponding muscle meats. (That said, fruits and vegetables are rich in phytonutrients like flavonoids and polyphenols that aren’t found in high concentrations in meats and organ meats, so fresh produce should always be a significant part of your diet.)
From Science Daily
Learning to hunt was a decisive step in human evolution. Hunting necessitated communication, planning and the use of tools, all of which demanded a larger brain. At the same time, adding meat to the diet made it possible to develop this larger brain.
Also from that same article it talks about how eating meat grows the brain faster and allows for infants to be weaned from their mothers quicker.
This is the type of mathematical model that Elia Psouni and her colleagues have built. They entered data on close to 70 mammalian species of various types into the model -- data on brain size and diet. Species for which at least 20 per cent of the energy content of their diet comes from meat were categorised as carnivores. The model shows that the young of all species cease to suckle when their brains have reached a particular stage of development on the path from conception to full brain-size. Carnivores, due to their high quality diet, can wean earlier than herbivores and omnivores.
So as you can see I don't simply hate the concept of being a vegan for the sheer fact that they wear hemp clothing and smell of petuli, hey I also own hemp clothing and do like some people who are vegans. But I hate the concept because I feel as if it is going against biology and for the most part aside from one or two that I've met they are mostly dickless assholes who can't stop preaching about cruelty to animals.

The truth of the matter is, is that going vegan is a whole hell of a lot more work then just being an omnivore in the way of getting proper nutrition. If you are an omnivore you are going to get more nutrition for your food assuming you don't eat a Standard American Diet [SAD]. Also, there are lots of vitamins you cannot get from plants that you can get from meat. Vitamin A, D, and B12 come to mind.

What vegans think is that certain foods have these vitamins but what they have are co-factors that don't always easily convert into the proper form.

The best example would be ALA not fully converting to DHA... probably should be eating fish bra.

From The Sweet Beet
Vitamin A: The “direct” form is only found in animal products -meat, egg yolks, dairy (though much less so than meat) and fish. The vitamin A found in orange and green vegetables is beta carotene which the body must first convert to the usable form of Vitamin A.  That conversion requires bile salts, which are produced by your liver when you consume fat (making fat essential on a vegan diet). So yes, you can obtain a version of Vitamin A in plants, but you’ll need about 6x as much beta cartonene to equal the amount found in direct Vitamin A. - See more at: http://www.thesweetbeet.com/vegan-diet/#sthash.sJfaf6XT.dpuf
 Vitamin A: The “direct” form is only found in animal products -meat, egg yolks, dairy (though much less so than meat) and fish. The vitamin A found in orange and green vegetables is beta carotene which the body must first convert to the usable form of Vitamin A.  That conversion requires bile salts, which are produced by your liver when you consume fat (making fat essential on a vegan diet). So yes, you can obtain a version of Vitamin A in plants, but you’ll need about 6x as much beta cartonene to equal the amount found in direct Vitamin A. 
That is just one vitamin and that is not including things like B12 which from my understanding eating Spirulina and Chlorella will not help with this.

So as you can see being a vegan is not stacking up to well on this list and I would not recommend doing this diet for health reasons. If you were going to do any sort of plant based diet at least be a prescetarian so you can eat fish. Notice how I did not say vegetarian?

I generally think vegetarianism is probably alright because you aren't denying yourself certain animal products. Only problem with that diet is that said animal products could be allergenic for people. Namely eggs and dairy can have some interesting affects on certain people so if you can stand to eat them then by all means do it.

This isn't even tackling the gluten issue. Gluten is it's own thing and you don't necessarily have to be eating this to fall into the vegan camp, but a lot of times these people are consuming large quantities of these foods to make up for the lack of calories in their diets, IMO.

Simply being I have met just as many fat vegans as I have skinny ones which is weird. Finally, to finish this article I would like to point out that being vegan also makes you more susceptible to mental illness.

From Psychology Today
It's a German study, and for a large population-based retrospective observational design, it's actually fairly thorough and sensible.  And if you are a vegetarian, it certainly doesn't say that vegetarianism causes mental health problems.  But in all but two studies done in the past, vegetarianism has been linked with higher rates of depression, anxiety, and particularly eating disorders (bingeing, restricting, and purging behaviors).  But to be perfectly honest, all those studies had some serious limitations (they were small, done special populations, and often measures based on just a few answers to general survey questions).  I've reviewed a few of them.  (My favorite has to be the one where they calculated arachidonic acid ingested to the hundredth of a gram based on data from a food frequency questionnaire, which seems very unlikely to be accurate)  I don't think it is a coincidence that the two positive studies were done by the same group of researchers in the Seventh Day Adventist population.
Also, note this is not a biased article the author generally tries to give alternative explanations to the causes of the reported claims. 

So as it sorta happened I cam off as an asshole who is attacking vegans. I of course have nothing against any of them personally and their are a few (a few) who are actually decent athletes. Mostly in the world of running and long distance: runner Scott Jurek comes to mind, Prince Fielder from the Detroit Tigers and MMA fighter Mac Danzig.

Each accomplishing more then I ever have so I clearly can't say that vegans can't be athletes or any such shit that is commonly an argument against them.

Really this article is just pointing out that being healthy doesn't exclusively make you vegan and that in fact maybe being vegan isn't the best thing for a person physiologically, evolutionarily or mentally.

In my mind it sorta boils down to food choices. Vegans on the surface probably appear healthier then most and they are since "most" tends to be people eating junk food and vegans are probably a tad more conscientious about their food choices. 

So being an omnivore can also mean you are unhealthy if you eat shit out of a bag for every meal.

Vitamin A: The “direct” form is only found in animal products -meat, egg yolks, dairy (though much less so than meat) and fish. The vitamin A found in orange and green vegetables is beta carotene which the body must first convert to the usable form of Vitamin A.  That conversion requires bile salts, which are produced by your liver when you consume fat (making fat essential on a vegan diet). So yes, you can obtain a version of Vitamin A in plants, but you’ll need about 6x as much beta cartonene to equal the amount found in direct Vitamin A.
B12:  This is the nutrient which vegans can potentially become deficient as you can only get naturally occurring B12 from animal products. (There are eight different B vitamins and our body needs them all).  It can take time for the implications of low B12 to show up, with anemia being the most common outcome of very low levels.
Vitamin D: This is another one found only in animal products. Cod liver oil is super high in it, as is shrimp, wild salmon, sardines, full-fat dairy products, and egg yolks. Yes you can get it from the sun, but most of us don’t spend 15 minutes a day, flesh exposed, palms open. Furthermore, the darker your skin, the less D your body will produce.
Protein: You can get some of the components of protein (the amino acids) from legumes, seeds and grain, but meat and fish contain complete protein (meaning they have all the essential amino acids). The amino acids in meat/fish are also in a form that is very easy for most people to digest. Many people find grains and legumes (which contain digestive inhibitors) quite hard to digest. Note too how little meat you actually need to get protein – 4 oz of beef provides 30 grams protein; salmon 25 grams; tofu 8 grams.
Zinc: Red meat is high in it and it comes in a form that many believe is easier for the body to break down than that found in grains and legumes.
- See more at: http://www.thesweetbeet.com/vegan-diet/#sthash.sJfaf6XT.dpuf
Vitamin A: The “direct” form is only found in animal products -meat, egg yolks, dairy (though much less so than meat) and fish. The vitamin A found in orange and green vegetables is beta carotene which the body must first convert to the usable form of Vitamin A.  That conversion requires bile salts, which are produced by your liver when you consume fat (making fat essential on a vegan diet). So yes, you can obtain a version of Vitamin A in plants, but you’ll need about 6x as much beta cartonene to equal the amount found in direct Vitamin A.
B12:  This is the nutrient which vegans can potentially become deficient as you can only get naturally occurring B12 from animal products. (There are eight different B vitamins and our body needs them all).  It can take time for the implications of low B12 to show up, with anemia being the most common outcome of very low levels.
Vitamin D: This is another one found only in animal products. Cod liver oil is super high in it, as is shrimp, wild salmon, sardines, full-fat dairy products, and egg yolks. Yes you can get it from the sun, but most of us don’t spend 15 minutes a day, flesh exposed, palms open. Furthermore, the darker your skin, the less D your body will produce.
Protein: You can get some of the components of protein (the amino acids) from legumes, seeds and grain, but meat and fish contain complete protein (meaning they have all the essential amino acids). The amino acids in meat/fish are also in a form that is very easy for most people to digest. Many people find grains and legumes (which contain digestive inhibitors) quite hard to digest. Note too how little meat you actually need to get protein – 4 oz of beef provides 30 grams protein; salmon 25 grams; tofu 8 grams.
Zinc: Red meat is high in it and it comes in a form that many believe is easier for the body to break down than that found in grains and legumes.
- See more at: http://www.thesweetbeet.com/vegan-diet/#sthash.sJfaf6XT.dpuf
Vitamin A: The “direct” form is only found in animal products -meat, egg yolks, dairy (though much less so than meat) and fish. The vitamin A found in orange and green vegetables is beta carotene which the body must first convert to the usable form of Vitamin A.  That conversion requires bile salts, which are produced by your liver when you consume fat (making fat essential on a vegan diet). So yes, you can obtain a version of Vitamin A in plants, but you’ll need about 6x as much beta cartonene to equal the amount found in direct Vitamin A. - See more at: http://www.thesweetbeet.com/vegan-diet/#sthash.sJfaf6XT.dpuf

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